600 DPI VS 1200 DPI

600 DPI vs 1200 DPI Printer – The Differences

If you are getting confused about the print resolution, this article on 600 dpi vs 1200 dpi would be the most resourceful one for you.

DPI or the dots per inch is the parameter by which we assess a printer’s efficiency & effectiveness of printing capacity. It also affects the print cost per page and we will illustrate how.

We will also present a hands-on comparison summary between the 600 dpi and 1200 dpi printers with a conclusive statement to ease your decision-making process.

What is Dots per Inch (DPI)?

Dots per inch or DPI is a measurement that shows how many dots are there in an inch of prints or scanned document. A higher number of dots represents that the document is more clear & lively. In a higher DPI print, there will be a smaller size of ink drops which helps to make the documents sharper.

Usually, dpi is communicated as 600 x 600 or 1200 x 1200. The two numbers represent both horizontal & vertical measurements of the dots in a document. Similarly, a higher dpi in the vertical axis refers to slower printing nozzle movement across the document.

For instance, a printed document in 1200 x 1200 dpi will become more time-consuming compared to dpi settings of 1200 x 600. Because choosing a half amount in a vertical line creates printing nozzle movement faster due to the less amount of droplets in the vertical axis.

What is Pixel Per Inch (PPI)?

Pixel per inch or PPI measures the print resolution of any digital image, whereas the DPI is used to measure the visible quality of the printouts. A higher PPI represents that there will be more pixels in one inch of an image which allows the user to expand the printout.

Alternatively, an image with a lower PPI represents that it would be broken if printouts are made beyond the recommended size.

In a nutshell, PPI is the input resolution of any digital image and the DPI is the output resolution of that image or other documents.

DPI Vs PPI

600 DPI print

Printing at 600 DPI represents that there would be 600 print dots in a square inch. This is a minimalist setting and is appropriate for beginners and economical users.

Usually, small offices and home users use 600 dpi settings to print draft documents which ultimately helps in keeping the printing cost down.

Advantages of 600 dpi printers

These are the positive sides of printing at 600 dpi

  • Minimum printing costs
  • Maintenance is easy
  • Ink consumption is lower than a dpi printer
  • good for printing draft documents

Disadvantages

These are the negative sides of printing at 600 dpi

  • Print quality is not premium grade
  • Color printing is not so impressive with 600 dpi
  • Adversely affects users’ perception if used by the businesses

1200 DPI printer

A 1200 DPI represents that there would be 1200 dots in a square inch of print. This is doubled by 600 dpi which denotes the higher print quality of a document. However, 1200 dpi always costs high along with a significant impact on print yield quantity.

Positive sides

These are the positive sides of having a 1200 dpi printer:

  • Ensures sharper prints with more details
  • Brings a premium appearance to the prints
  • Suitable for both color & black printing
  • can handle a variety of documents which a 600 dpi may not
  • Easy to maintain

Negative Sides

These are the negative sides of having a 1200 dpi printer

  • The cost per print is higher than that of a 600 dpi printer
  • Expensive compared to the 600 dpi printers

600 DPI Vs 1200 DPI Printer Comparison

600 DPI VS 1200 DPI

This is a quick comparison that differentiates between the 600 dpi and 1200 dpi printers.

600 DPI 1200 DPI
Cost per page Low High
Ink Consumption Low High
Print Quality Moderate Premium
Color Printing Not recommended Excellent
Scan time Low Medium
Sharpness Low Better
Maintenance Easy Easy
Best Printer Lexmark HP Office Jet

Frequently Asked Question

These are the frequently asked questions or FAQs on the 600 DPI & 1200 DPI prints.

Is 1200 dpi better for printing?

Yes. 1200 dpi printers offer greater sharpness & details of the character and are recommended for professional printing. However, 1200 dpi prints require more ink consumption which must have to be considered from the users’ point of view. For home use and draft document printing, 600 dpi can also serve the purpose.

Does a higher PPI represent premium quality?

PPI or pixel per inch refers to the resolution of any digital image. A higher PPI image allows you to get it printed in a larger size due to having more resolution within that. However, PPI or pixel density does not always reflect the print quality of documents unless it is scanned from an earlier printout.

What is the best DPI to print documents?

If the document is only black and does not contain any significant visual objects then the 600 dpi printer will do the job. In fact, they can help keep print costs at a minimum. But for the image or color print, we always recommend a 1200 dpi printer for better details.

What is the best DPI for scanning?

Scanning at 1200 DPI will always create a larger file size. Unless you need press quality scanning, we recommend using 600 dpi settings while scanning any black or color prints. However, 1200 dpi deals with Grayscale & partially toned images very carefully.

Which DPI is better for laser printers?

A laser printer is designed to print at 2400 x 600 dpi but the print quality would remain the same at 1200 x 1200 dpi since both options would make 1,440,000 dots in one printed inch. In both cases, the differences are not noticeable by the naked human eye and both DPI settings would work fine. If any user needs a pure Black & White photographic feel over the Monochromic prints, then the ideal choice would be to use an inkjet printer with a liquid ink tank that makes prints with pigment inks.

Wrapping up

Choosing between 600 dpi and 1200 dpi is an easy choice. If you do not need to print anything professional then 600 dpi is always recommended. Otherwise, go for a 1200 DPI printer which opens all the doors to experiment with different printing objects in the future.

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